Interesting Facts About Love and Marriage in America Today

Although the face of marriage in America has changed dramatically through the years. Nonethless, love still tops the reasons why couples get married. That is, if ever they decide to get married.

The Pew Research Center provided information that the trend of unmarried American adults cohabiting with their partner is currently on the rise. Pew gathered that In 2016, unmarried adults living together numbered as many as 18 million, a stark increase of 29% from the figure established in 2007. About half of those who simply moved in with their partners are below 35 years old. One interesting fact is that the other rising half of cohabiters in America are aged 50 years and above.

 

Apparently, in almost any group of generation today, whether Z, X, Millennial or Baby Boomers, most think that society no longer minds if couples are just living together or married. In a 2019 Pew Research involving the so-called Silent Generation, or people born between 1925 and 1942 who represent at least 20 million adult Americans, fifty-four (54%) also shared the belief living together without officially tying the knot does not make a difference in the present day society. Still, a sizable forty-one percent (41%) of this generation still think of cohabitation as a bad idea.

 

Now for those who do get married, a Pew 2013 Survey revealed several reasons why they decided to make their union legally binding.

Love still tops the list. The Pew Survey said that eighty-eight percent (88%) of Americans who responded, cited love as the foremost reason for getting married.

 

Commitment to a lifelong relationship was cited by eighty-one percent (81%) of the respondents.

 

Companionship is also a compelling reason for about seventy-six percent (76%) of Americans who decided to marry.

 

Other Reasons have been noted by a few, such as religion (30%), financial (28%) and legal rights and benefits (22%). Such reasons were interesting enough for Pew on which to conduct a survey.

Pew Research on Couples with Different Religion and Political Views

 

Even if love is still the main reason why people get married, Pew found out that a sizable number of couples got married even if they did not have the same religious beliefs.

 

According to a 2014 Pew Research about interfaith marriages, many were Christians who married a partner who do not belong to any religious affiliation. About thirty-nine percent (39%) who got married in 2010 settled down with a partner who has a different religion. When compared to those who wed in 1960, the figure reached only nineteen percent (19%). Suggesting that religion in modern American marriages is no longer as important as before.

 

Yet when it comes to political views, a 2016 Pew Research Survey revealed that seventy-seven (77%) of married or cohabiting Republicans and Democrats, settled or are living with a partner who supports the same political party as theirs.

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